Moving on from writing rejection

Tyne Bridge getting ready for The Great North Run 2014

I was another writer who did not get chosen for a mentor during PitchWars. I had some great feedback that can really help me in my revisions and future books. It’s a subjective process and one contest shouldn’t make me feel down in the dumps about the work I’d done so far. After all, I entered the contest when my brain told me to not bother because no one would be interested anyway. Now that I know that I’ve not been chosen, I can just pick up where I left off and keep going.

You believing any of this? Nah, didn’t think so.

I was upset. I cried on the phone to my folks in Florida about how no one wanted my work. I didn’t want to do anything. I stayed in bed, I felt sorry for myself, I contemplated why I was writing what I was writing, who it was for, what it was for, and if I should just try something totally different. Seriously, the sadness wasn’t just from not being chosen so much as that it stopped my mojo from flowing. Since Wednesday, I have been so weepy and wallowing in my self pity because I didn’t know if I should keep working on this big series book project I wanted to do, or just set it aside and do something completely different.

I sort of still don’t know.

I know quitting is not an option because, seriously, how would I spend my time if it weren’t working on a book, or writing notes for another book project? (I have too many notes and plans for books to ignore them at this point anyway.)

But, I do think it’s perfectly okay to take a step back and reflect on what you’re doing. I know all the motivational quotes in the world about never giving up and how failure isn’t an option and how rejection is all part of the game. However, it’s hard to be positive all the time, especially when you’re just having a crummy week and the rejection letter sort of solidifies your belief that, yes, things just suck right now.

So, as a help to you and myself, I’ve comprised a little list of articles regarding rejection to help us all get through the painful process.

I hope that everyone who was rejected for PitchWars still participates in PitMad on Monday, Sept 9th. Personally, I’m just going to put some queries out to prove to myself that I’m moving on, getting back on the horse, not letting it get me down, and all that junk.

Here are a couple of resources for helping you write a good Twitter pitch:

And finally, here’s a motivational speech from Sly Stallone:

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About Suzanne Schultz Pick

Married to Steve. One cat named Jake. Librarian IT Assistant. Writer, teacher, blogger, technological princess.
This entry was posted in All About Me, Books, Publishing, Writing and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Moving on from writing rejection

  1. I love how you turned your rejection into this hyper-drive to do better. That’s what it takes, after all, isn’t it? J.K. Rowling was rejected more than 12 times before she finally got published.

    As to your question on why you should write: You should write because you want to. You should write, because nobody else has told the stories you want to tell. You should write to make YOURSELF happy.

    If other people like what you say, then hurray! But someone is always going to disapprove. As long as you’re proud of your writing, who cares?

  2. Map of Time says:

    I wish you a lot of luck and success, Suzanne.

  3. Rejection sucks. But sometimes it is good to take a rest and reevaluate. Best of luck with your queries!

    My favorite inspirational speech (technically 40 speeches in 2 minutes): http://youtu.be/d6wRkzCW5qI

  4. lorellepage says:

    I’m receiving my first rejections now, and although I have yet to shed a tear, I know that when I receive the final ones, I will. I don’t know how you move on, but I think you are extremely brave to even enter into Pitch Wars. I don’t know if I could even put myself out there yet 🙂

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